Musings, Travel

Travel Inspiration

A graduation announcement came in the mail recently. Many of my friends have children who are achieving this milestone and it was a joy to open the envelope and share in the happiness of a young man who is destined for greatness.

Congratulations, Brady.

The last grad I knew was a few years ago. I bought him a bag to use when he travels and delivered it with a quote that I love: Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer.

That memory got me thinking about other travel quotes I love. They inspire me, they make me laugh and they feed my wanderlust. 

I admire the Dalai Lama. He laughs his way through life despite challenges and trouble. He offers great pieces of advice … like this one: Once a year, go someplace you’ve never been.

The Dalai Lama’s sense of humor comes through even on his Instagram page.

Great authors, like Mark Twain and Ernest Hemingway, have written entire books that can inspire travel … and quotable lines like these:

The journey is usually more important than the destination.
More people need to travel.

Success expert Stephen Covey suggests: Live your life by a compass, not a clock

So many of us grew up with inspirations like this from Dr. Seuss.

I love the simplicity of this.

Fourteenth century scholar and adventurer Ibn Battutu offers a quote that touches my soul: Travel leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller

I’m not only curious about other cultures, but am fascinated by languages. It thrills me to find words that don’t have English equivalents:

 — The German word Fernweh, for instance, means “An ache for distant places; missing places you have never been. A certain craving for travel.”

 — I can relate to the Swedes, who say, Resfeber. It means “The restless race of the traveler’s heart before the journey begins, when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together.”

 — This Danish word makes me sad even though I can TOTALLY relate to it: Onism. The frustration of being stuck in just one body that inhabits only one place at a time. In other words, you can’t see everything no matter how much you want to.

 — And speaking of foreign words, the Japanese say yoko meshi. It describes the stress of speaking a foreign language.

There’s a whole world out there just waiting to be explored. Find your inspiration, grab a bag and hit the road!

PS. Congratulations, Brady, on yet another step towards a monumental life. 

© The World A to Z, LLC 2021 — Unless otherwise indicated, no compensation was received for this blog.

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